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31-08-2011 | Cardiometabolic | Article

Adolescent and parental lifestyles influence teen CV risk

Abstract

Free abstract

MedWire News: The lifestyles of adolescents, and those of their parents, have an impact on their risk for cardiovascular disease, results from a Japanese study show.

Participation in school-based extracurricular activities, time spent watching television, regular breakfast consumption, total energy intake, fiber intake per 1000 kcal, and parental body-mass index (BMI) were independently associated with the levels of one or more cardiovascular risk factors in adolescents, report Masao Yoshinaga (National Hospital Organization Kagoshima Medical Center) and colleagues.

These risk factors included abdominal obesity, elevated triglyceride levels, decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and hyperglycemia.

And the influence of paternal or maternal obesity on adolescent obesity differs between adolescent genders, they add.

"Approaches focusing on the parents should take the gender of the adolescents into account," they write in the Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis.

The study included 755 individuals (424 girls) aged from 15 to 18 years. The researchers obtained information on the lifestyles of the participants and their parents, including participation in school-based extracurricular activities, time spent on physical activity, time spent watching television, average daily food intake as well as weight status.

Multivariate analysis revealed that adolescents' participation in extracurricular physical activities, time spent watching television, regular breakfast consumption, total energy intake, fiber intake per 1000 kcal, and parental BMI were independently associated with levels of one or more cardiovascular risk factors.

In particular, participation in extracurricular physical activities had a profound effect on adolescent cardiovascular risk factor levels.

Further analysis revealed that the risk for male adolescent obesity was associated with paternal obesity, but not with maternal obesity.

Conversely, the risk for female adolescent obesity was associated with maternal obesity, but not with paternal obesity.

"Participation in extracurricular physical activities may be the first-line approach for adolescents to maintain favorable cardiovascular risk factor levels," conclude Yoshinaga and team.

MedWire (www.medwire-news.md) is an independent clinical news service provided by Springer Healthcare Limited. © Springer Healthcare Ltd; 2011

By Piriya Mahendra