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Asthma

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18-04-2017 | Asthma | News | Article

Clinical score predicts risk of severe asthma exacerbation trajectory

Researchers have devised and validated a clinical risk score that accurately identifies asthma patients who will have persistently frequent severe exacerbations over the long term.

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Allergy 2017; Advance online publication

18-04-2017 | Asthma | News | Article

Many patients fail to achieve good asthma control despite stepped treatment optimization

Stepped increases to optimize treatment improve asthma control, but for many patients optimal control still remains elusive, suggest findings from the real-life COAS study.

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Eur Respir J 2017; 49: 1501885

18-04-2017 | Asthma | News | Article

Asthma exacerbations reliably predict future risk

A history of asthma exacerbation is a reliable indicator of future risk for exacerbations, say Japanese researchers.

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Allergol Int 2017; Advance online publication

20-03-2017 | Asthma | News | Article

Th2 molecular phenotypes defined for severe asthma

Researchers have defined three molecular phenotypes of asthma, based on T-helper cell type 2 status, which could help better target specific treatments.

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Eur Respir J 2017; 49: 1602135, 1700053

13-02-2017 | Asthma | News | Article

Eosinophilic airway inflammation and microbiome link

Eosinophilic airway inflammation in patients with asthma is associated with an altered microbiome in the lower airway, report researchers.

Source:

J Allergy Clin Immunol 2017; Advance online publication

13-02-2017 | Asthma | News | Article

Biomarkers aid Type-2 inflammation phenotype selection

Researchers have identified a panel of clinically accessible biomarkers that may help select asthma patients with an airway-mucosal T-helper 2 inflammation phenotype.

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J Allergy Clin Immunol 2017; Advance online publication

13-02-2017 | Asthma | News | Article

Mepolizumab benefits Japanese patients with severe eosinophilic asthma

Mepolizumab is effective for the treatment of severe eosinophilic asthma in Japanese patients, indicates a post-hoc analysis of the phase III MENSA trial.

Source:

Allergol Int 2017; Advance online publication

16-01-2017 | Asthma | News | Article

Asthma phenotypes identified, validated

Researchers have defined and validated four asthma phenotypes that they believe will aid patient classification and the development of tailored therapies.

Source:

Respir Res 2016; 17: 165

16-01-2017 | Asthma | News | Article

Age and asthma severity affect corticosteroid response

Asthma may be more resilient to treatment as patients become adults, but one in five of those with severe disease can still expect lung function improvement following systemic corticosteroid administration, say researchers.

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Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2016; Advance online publication

16-01-2017 | Asthma | News | Article

CD48 expression possible marker for mild asthma

CD48, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored receptor, may be a marker for diagnosing mild asthma, say researchers.

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Allergy 2016; Advance online publication

20-12-2016 | Asthma | News | Article

Severe asthma exists despite suppressed tissue inflammation

Researchers have found that patients with asthma receiving recommended treatment can have severe disease despite suppressed endobronchial tissue inflammation in the proximal airways.

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Eur Respir J 2016 48: 1307–1319

22-11-2016 | Asthma | News | Article

Eosinophilia worsens asthma exacerbation severity

Eosinophilic asthma exacerbations identify patients with a severe disease course who could benefit from specific interventions, researchers report.

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Respirology 2016; Advance online publication

27-05-2015 | Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease | News | Article

Airway and systemic inflammation predict COPD exacerbation

Researchers have found a link between increased airway and systemic inflammation and frequent exacerbations in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

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Chest 2015; Advance online publication

21-05-2015 | Asthma | News | Article

Women more likely to be hospitalised after asthma emergency care

US research shows that women who attend the emergency department with acute asthma are almost twice as likely to be admitted to hospital than men despite several measures of asthma control, treatment and severity being more favourable in women.

Source:

Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2015; Advance online publication

21-05-2015 | Asthma | News | Article

Prediagnostic lung function impairment common in older asthma patients

Older adults with newly diagnosed asthma are not only more likely to have pre-existing lung function impairment than younger adults, but they also experience a more rapid decline of lung function, a Danish team reports in Respiratory Medicine.

Source:

Respir Med 2015; Advance online publication

21-05-2015 | Asthma | News | Article

Pharmacy data ‘could reduce asthma treatment inequality’

Research has found that the ratio of dispensed asthma controller to rescue medication at community pharmacies is associated with the need for emergency asthma treatment in paediatric patients.

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Pediatrics 2015; Advance online publication