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12-10-2010 | Cardiometabolic | Article

Nonfasting triglycerides ‘offer no extra information on CVD risk’

Abstract

Free abstract

MedWire News: Blood levels of nonfasting triglycerides are associated with the risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in men, but the link offers no predictive information beyond standard risk factors, a Norwegian study suggests.

Anja Lindman (University of Oslo) and team investigated the link between nonfasting triglycerides and CVD within a large population-based dataset. Information on 86,261 men and women who participated in the Norwegian Counties Study was included; they were aged 20-50 years and free of CVD and at baseline.

The cohort was followed-up for a mean of 27 years, during which time 9528 men and 5267 women died.

Reporting their findings in the European Journal of Epidemiology, Lindman et al say that, after adjusting for CVD risk factors other than high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, higher levels of nonfasting triglycerides predicted increased CVD mortality.

In women, each 1-mmol/l (88.6 mg/dl) increase in nonfasting triglycerides was associated with a 16% increase in all-cause mortality, a 20% increase in CVD mortality, and a 26% increase in ischemic heart disease (IHD) mortality.

In men, the corresponding figures were 3%, 3%, and 3%, with all being statistically significant.

Further adjustment for HDL cholesterol caused these associations to become nonsignificant in women but strengthened them in men, such that the risk increases were 6% for all-cause mortality, 7% for CVD mortality, and 4% for IHD mortality.

However, adjusting for Framingham Risk Score caused the association between nonfasting triglycerides and CVD mortality to disappear in both men and women.

The authors therefore conclude that nonfasting triglycerides "added no predictive information on CVD mortality beyond the Framingham coronary heart disease Risk Score in men and women."

MedWire (www.medwire-news.md) is an independent clinical news service provided by Current Medicine Group, a trading division of Springer Healthcare Limited. © Springer Healthcare Ltd; 2010

By Joanna Lyford